About

Welcome friends!

It is with great pleasure that we introduce the latest venture of the Mennonite Heritage Center, the Goschenhoppen Historians, and the Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center, all located in Montgomery County, PA.

Each week we will be offering installments of the Pennsylvania Dutch At-Home Companion—a blog of articles, recipes, helpful tips and more relating to our Pennsylvania Dutch heritage and presence in contemporary life. Be sure to subscribe, so you receive new posts by email!

Home and family life were central to our Pennsylvania Dutch ancestors, and in this unprecedented time of staying at home, we hope you’ll be inspired to bring pieces of the past to your present through Pennsylvania Dutch cooking, gardening, and crafts.


Goschenhoppen Historians

Goschenhoppen is one of the oldest continuously existing Pennsylvania German communities in America. This geographic region occupies a small corner of southeastern Pennsylvania in Montgomery County. The Goschenhoppen Historians Inc., was founded in 1964 in order to preserve the folk culture of this area’s earliest immigrant settlers, known as the Pennsylvania Dutch. Today, the Goschenhoppen Historians maintain several museums, a library, and offer educational and seasonal events throughout the year.

Mennonite Heritage Center

The Mennonite Heritage Center is a museum and historical library dedicated to preserving and sharing the stories of Mennonite faith and life in eastern Pennsylvania. Mennonite Christians first settled in the Delaware Valley in 1683 and have been part of eastern Pennsylvania’s community and religious life for over 300 years. You are invited to visit the heritage center to see changing exhibits, use our historical library and take part in events, programs and workshops throughout the year.

Schwenkfelder Library and Heritage Center

The Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center, with its internationally recognized collections and research facilities, engages visitors in exploration of the themes of religious freedom, tolerance, migration, and heritage in their own lives and the lives of their families through the stories of the Schwenkfelders and the Pennsylvania Germans of the Perkiomen region – people whose bonds of faith, family, and community tell a fundamental American story.